MBI Team Member Gregg Scott: Medical Equipment for Tanzania

Our first container of medical equipment and supplies, shipped in 2016, was received gratefully by Mwanamonga villagers, three hospitals and many village dispensaries. The Mwanamonga dispensary had no beds or gurneys, and now have all they need for the size of their facility. While I didn’t get to visit every hospital and village dispensary, I did get to pass out a few wheelchairs. To be able to share some hope and dignity with folks who are Polio survivors but who have crawled on their hands and knees for the past 30 years was a highlight of my life. Esther, on my left in the photo below, had done just that. To sit alongside her in her wheelchair the following week at a church service was an incredible joy for me. I was able to travel to Bugando Hospital and help Dr. Masala’s team unpack and install the women’s mammography biopsy machine. Dr. Masala had completed 7 years of oncology training in Italy on an identical machine and then returned to Tanzania, never dreaming that very soon the same machine would be delivered to his workplace. One of the engineers said to me during the installation: “Do you realize just how impossible it would be for us to even hope for a machine like this? Do you realize how many Tanzanian shillings it would cost?” The average villager’s income is about TZS 10,000—$5.00 USD per day—that’s if they can get work. Please pray for our efforts as we pack and load two more shipments. We need God’s favor in every area. We’ve taken on a seemingly enormous task, but, one day...

Double Vision

MBI’s primary focus is connecting Christians with frontline missions, which typically means YWAM ministries. But sometimes our staff stretches our boundaries in God-sized ways, and we knew our readers would love to hear and perhaps be part of this unfolding story: Gregg Scott knows that clean, available water is life’s most basic need. As part of MBI’s field staff, he has devoted himself to helping people in emerging nations supply themselves with this precious commodity using appropriate, sustainable technology tailored to their needs and abilities. Since 1996 Gregg has served with the Bali Appropriate Technology Institute (BATI), helping Indonesians cultivate local water supplies. In 2014, he was contacted by Father Hugo Lungu, an African priest from southwestern Tanzania serving small Catholic parishes in Central Montana. At Lungu’s invitation, Gregg accompanied the priest to his home village of Mwanamanga to conduct a water survey. There he found 8000 people with virtually no water except for what could be drawn from four barely-working wells by way of hand pumps. Three other pumps sat useless, including one serving 450 school children, forcing them to haul buckets of water to school for drinking and flushing toilets. Village women carried five-gallon buckets of “pure” water on their heads from open-pit, untreated wells. Although Gregg wasn’t in Mwanamanga to work, like many mission builders, he says he just couldn’t walk away without doing something. Selecting three young village men willing to learn a new trade and take responsibility, Gregg set about making simple repairs and training the men to do the same. He has since made two other trips to continue that training. “Our initial...